How To Write a Cover Letter

How To Write a Cover Letter

February 20, 2014  |  How to, Writing Tips  |  No Comments

Writing a cover letter that stands out can be the difference between attaining the job of your dreams and not being considered at all. A competitive listing may receive hundreds, if not thousands, of applicants which means that the statistical chance of them choosing you is relatively small. Although a well written cover letter is not sufficient to guarantee that you get the job you desire, it is almost always a necessary component.

Read More
How To Overcome Procrastination - Help and Solutions

How To Overcome Procrastination – Help and Solutions

October 3, 2013  |  How to, Managing Time, Self-Improvement  |  No Comments

Charles Dickens once famously remarked: “My advice is to never do tomorrow what you can do today. Procrastination is the thief of time.”; pertinent advice for all that are listening, one must agree. The reasonable person within us tends to agree with this sentiment, it is after all only logical to not postpone important work until tomorrow when it can just as easily be finished today.

Read More
How To Code

How To Code

July 10, 2013  |  General Tips, How to, Uncategorized  |  No Comments

In this guide, we will cover how you can teach yourself computer programming. Learning how to code is in essence the process of acquiring a new language and a new mindset. Computer programming has become the fad of our times, its benefits are numerous and the way to learn it is rather straightforward and easy.

To learn how to code, one first needs to develop a learning strategy. Below, I have listed a few things to consider before embarking on your journey.

Read More
How to Write an Entrance Essay for Grad School

How to Write an Entrance Essay for Grad School

May 23, 2012  |  How to  |  No Comments

Preparing a strong application that demonstrates how a student is capable of meeting the expectations and demands of graduate school is critical during the admissions process. There are multiple components to a graduate school application and schools vary in what information and documentation they require to complete an application.

Read More
How To Improve Different Kinds of Memory

How To Improve Different Kinds of Memory

April 16, 2012  |  How to, Memory Techniques  |  No Comments

The human memory isn’t one single process, but instead can actually be categorized into many different mental activities.

Read More
How to Have a Good Night’s Sleep

How to Have a Good Night’s Sleep

April 14, 2012  |  How to, Memory Techniques  |  No Comments

A good night’s sleep is a remedy for so many problems. How often have you not found yourself dead tired in the morning completely unable to study or get anything done

Read More
How To Find Cheap Textbooks

How To Find Cheap Textbooks

April 14, 2012  |  How to, Note-Taking  |  No Comments

Finding cheap textbooks can be difficult and cumbersome. The easiest way to get a hold of a copy of the required textbooks is of course to purchase the book through the local campus book shop or shop online on one of the many online book stores. However, there are also cheaper alternatives that could save a great deal of many in the long run.

In this article, we will discuss some inexpensive ways to find your textbook.

1

BookByte – Your Source For Cheap Textbooks

Bookbyte is a website designated for selling and trading textbooks. You can find all sorts of cheap college textbooks ranging from anything from mathematics & natural sciences to social sciences and art. Great place to start digging for cheap textbooks. Click here to start browsing!

2

The library

The classic venue for students since time immemorial. If you are short on cash, the library is definitely the first place to visit. Many university libraries have a policy of storing – at the very least – 1 copy of every required course textbook. These copies are often restricted to by read only on library grounds and can’t be borrowed. If you’re library has such a policy, it can be a great place to study, especially if you don’t need to have the book with you at all times. If you do, I would recommend trying to find an inexpensive copy of the textbook online.

3

Borrowing From Friends

If you at the present time know any seniors, that’s a great thing. As friends, you can borrow or lend copies of your textbooks to each other. Remember to treat that person’s copy as if it was your own, return it in good condition as soon as you don’t need it anymore. I’m sure you are aware how irritating it can be when someone loses something you lent out to them.

How To Conquer the Expository Essay

How To Conquer the Expository Essay

November 1, 2011  |  How to, Writing Tips

Technology has vastly changed the educational landscape in recent decades. The introduction to the classroom of tablets, easy internet access, and learning management systems (LMS) has altered the way teachers present new material and students process it. Nevertheless, some things about formal schooling show no signs of changing anytime in the next couple generations. Children will always have to read and write. They will always be taught certain basics in math and history. And, at least based on how things currently stand, they will always have to write the expository essay.

The expository essay is both loved and hated by those in the education world. Some claim that it instructs children in the fundamentals of writing, instilling in them the central abilities to analyze, interpret, and tie everything together. Others deride expository essays as limiting and formulaic, arguing that it restricts a child’s writing ability and breeds generations of youngster’s who have no love for the art.

Regardless of your opinion, it’s hard to say that the expository essay is not conquerable. By being aware of its structure and following a few key steps, there’s really no reason why you can’t excel on your expository assignment – whether you love it or hate it. Here are some tips to keep in mind:

The Thesis is Everything
The most important part of writing a successful expository essay is coming up with a strong and clear thesis statement. The thesis must be arguable, you must be able to support it with evidence, and that evidence must be able to be broken down into body paragraphs. Ultimately, every element of the essay revolves around the thesis: the introduction builds to it, the body paragraphs aggregately support it, and the conclusion considers its implications.

Build Body Paragraphs Around Your Evidence
Whether your essay discusses a work of literature or a political controversy, you’re going to want to break it down into pieces of evidence in order to support your argument and fit the expository context. When planning a body paragraph, make sure to build it around that paragraph’s key piece of evidence. Then, set-up the evidence with a sentence beforehand and explain it with a sentence or two afterwards. Then, once the evidence is in the paragraph and enclosed by your analysis, add a topic and concluding sentence that best connect the evidence to your surrounding paragraphs and to the thesis.

Separate Yourself From the Rest
In the likely case that you’re writing this expository essay for a class, there’s a good chance that you’ll come up with a solid thesis and decent supporting paragraphs and a perfectly acceptable conclusion – just like many of your classmates. To truly separate yourself from the rest, look to make your transitions as smooth as possible and your conclusion as strong and far-reaching as you can. Organize your paragraphs in a way that naturally lead to seamless transitions for example, and don’t be afraid to discuss larger implications of your argument at the end of your conclusion. It is also helpful to have a wide repertoire of transitions from which to pull. If done right, your essay will be greatly strengthened as a result.

There are many other methods and means of improving your skills as an expository writer. Although a sometimes boring and formulaic essay approach, the expository assignment certainly forces you to think about structure. In any piece of writing, it’s undeniably an important component to consider.

How To Study For Exams

How To Study For Exams

July 17, 2011  |  Exam Taking, General Tips, How to  |  2 Comments

Interested in knowing how to study for upcoming exams? In this post, we’ll go through the most important parts of the process which unfortunately tends to be overlooked far too often.

1. The urgency of NOW!

I’ve noticed a strange phenomenon pertaining to studying. For some reason, when it comes to exams, people tend to worry a lot more about their exams than they they do actually preparing. If you are currently worried about an upcoming exam, why not harness that negative energy into something positive instead? Whenever you start getting worried again it becomes time to hit the books. Do not succumb to procrastination. Do your studying and do it now!

2. A road map helps a long way

Always keep your exam date near to heart. Time tends to go by pretty fast, you may be surprised that 3 weeks left have all of sudden turned into 5 days left. Don’t let this happen to you. Organize your studies and memorize all of your test dates. Put them up on the wall if necessary.

A good way of constructing your road map is to first set the date for your upcoming exam, then outline all the major topics that you would need to have covered until then. Finally, you can divide these topics into smaller tasks, describing the everyday tedious “on the ground” “getting your hands dirty” work that simply has to be done. This could be something like reading chapter 3 or solving problem 5a.

3. Compile an I Don’t Know Paper (IDKP)

This is something that I personally like to do. Whenever you begin a new course, start out by getting a piece of paper or a text document and then start recording all of the things that you need to understand before the test date. These are the things that we intend to ask our professors but instead we put it up and thus forget about it until it’s already to late. By collecting all of the I Don’t Know’s in a IDKP, you can then, at the end of each week seek out the answers to these questions either by asking a colleague or your professor or by simply going to your local library and/or the internet.

Either way, don’t let it go unanswered or you will regret it later on when sitting during the exam only to have realized that your intended inquiry is now an exam question. The the motto is: Answer your own questions before they become exam questions!

4. Are you on track?

It’s easy to neglect work, even easier when it comes to education. That’s why you should appoint one day at the end of the week for the sole purpose of tracking your progress. Are you on track? Have you finished the tasks that you’ve outlined in your road map? Have you answered all the questions that you have been thinking about? If not, then no play for you until you’re back on chart.

Sure, missing out on one day isn’t that bad. The problem my friend, is when one day becomes two days and two turn into three and so on. Days tend to accumulate pretty quickly. If you’re behind schedule you should strive to get back on schedule as soon as possible. The longer you wait, the more difficult it will become to get back on track.

How To Become a Better Reader

How To Become a Better Reader

February 13, 2011  |  How to, Reading  |  16 Comments

Everyone wants to become a good reader. The path towards improving ones reading skills isn’t always easy. However once you’ve managed to improve your reading you’ll be much more effective.

Read More