What’s a good study habit?

April 3, 2007  |  Educational Theory

What really counts as a good study habit anyway? I see it over and over again, how all of these people go around stressing the importance of developing good study habits but without really asking them selves: who defines what study habits are “good” or “bad”? Why should you be forced to learn in a way that doesn’t suit you, I mean we all learn things differently, right?

Enough ranting, here is 3 common traits I’ve noticed in good study habits:

1. Efficiency

The habit has to be able to return a pretty good deal for your investment. As basic as this might sound, it’s very common for some students to develop fruitless habits such as trying to study in front of the TV or while surfing. [An exemption to this is of course when visiting my site :mrgreen:]. The funny thing is that some people never learn, it’s impossible to study while IM’ing, chatting, or watching TV and I don’t care how talented you are you can still only give your 100% attention to 1 thing.

2. Time’ish

Some study habits are indeed efficient but they take up to much time. My advice would be not to necessarily dump the good habit all together but to try to make it withing a given time frame. This also means that one should not be naive and think that you could start studing at midnight and study all the night, this is never the case. The usual scenario is that you wake up only to find your self with the book as a pillow.

3. Ethical

Yup, you gotta keep your habits ethical! For instance, alcohol does NOT improve your memory nor does it give you an “energy boost” to help you think. (Want energy, just buy a jolt cola or something). In short, keep it ethical, synchronized and efficient!

That is all for now, don’t forget to subscribe to this blog!

About the author

ABDERISAK ADAM is an author, blog writer and a PhD candidate in the institution of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Chalmers University of Technology. He is also the owner and webmaster of www.study-habits.com, a website dedicated to the discussion of study techniques in the context of higher education. Adam is the author of a number of publications including 'The Study Guide PRO'. You can connect with him through Google+, Linkedin or by submitting a form.


1 Comment


  1. The ideas were very progressive and i here that alot.My tip also is don’t have food in front of you or a phone.

    thx

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